Category Archives: Real Estate and Housing News

Creating Cleaner Indoor Air, Today

(Family Features)–Creating more airflow is an important step to improving your indoor environment, but considerations like air quality should not be overlooked. More air is a good thing, but more clean air is better yet.

Everyday home life activities such as cooking, showering, lighting candles, sleeping and doing laundry can all contribute to polluted indoor air, which over time can lead to the development of illnesses.

These tips from the indoor climate experts at Velux can help make the air inside your home healthier:

– Keep bathroom doors closed and turn on the extractor fan or open a window or skylight when showering.

– Turn the hood fan on when cooking and open your windows, if weather permits.

– Avoid burning candles excessively; look for alternatives such as sprigs of lavender to add a natural fresh scent.

– Dry clothes outside when possible, which reduces carbon emissions from the dryer and minimizes potential pollutants traveling through the dryer vent.- Clean regularly with non-chemical based cleaning products, and pay attention to ingredients in cleaning products that may create hazardous fumes.

Source: Velux

Thanks for visiting my Blog site. If you would like to discuss this topic with me or get more information please contact me by calling 919-247-4667 or emailing me at Tim@TheTrianglesBroker.com. And you can always visit my personal real estate website for lots of additional information and to search for homes at www.TheTrianglesBroker.com or www.BuyAndSelllingTriangleHomes.com  McBrayer – The Triangles Broker.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2018. All rights reserved.

Smart Homes: The Way of the Future or a Risk to Homeowners?

By Liz Dominguez

Glitches of early iterations aside, AI-based technology has come a long way, and has an increasingly active presence in the lives of homeowners who are looking for convenience and savings in a pushed-for-time era. From adaptive thermostats that automatically gauge energy usage and alter temperatures for optimal savings, to smart home speakers that use sophisticated artificial intelligence to provide services and information in real-time, a smart homeowner can now cross off a variety of menial tasks from their daily to-do list without doing more than speaking a phrase out loud or clicking a button on their mobile device.
 
What is the true cost of this convenience? Some gadget adopters are reporting invasion of privacy, security risks, and more. For those who have not yet invested in smart home technology, these factors are largely holding them back; in fact, it is the second-biggest reason for hesitation for 17 percent of non-users, behind price (42 percent), according to a recently released report by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), "Smart Home, Seamless Life: Unlocking a Culture of Convenience." In addition, 56 percent of surveyed individuals stated they would choose encryption to protect their data when creating their own smart home.
 
What are these misuses of technology that could lead to privacy or security risks? These are a few of the reported instances thus far:
 
1. Gadgets May Be Susceptible to Hacking
Last August, Wired published a story about a British security researcher for MWR Labs, Mark Barnes, who was able to install malware on an Amazon Echo device, turning it into a surveillance device that silently streamed audio to his own server. While newer models cannot be jailbroken this way, Amazon has not released any software to fix the issue with older units.
 
For the typical owner, this may not seem like a significant violation; however, this could lead to another type of home theft in which fraudsters break into homes looking to steal identifying information via smart home gadgets, leaving little to no evidence of their break-in behind. While Barnes installed code for the specific purpose of audio streaming, he clarified that the installation of malware could serve other uses, such as stealing access to a homeowner's Amazon account, installing ransomware or attacking parts of the network.
 
2. Smart Technology Could Lead to Location-Based Tracking
Earlier this month, security investigator Brian Krebs reported on a privacy vulnerability for both Google Home and Chromecast—found by Craig Young, a researcher with security firm Tripwire—that leaks accurate location information about its users.
 
According to Young, attackers can use these Google devices to send a link (which could be anything from a tweet to an advertisement) to the connected user; if the link is clicked and the page left opened for about a minute, the attacker is able to obtain a location.
 
"The difference between this and a basic IP geolocation is the level of precision," Young said in the article. "For example, if I geo-locate my IP address right now, I get a location that is roughly two miles from my current location at work. For my home internet connection, the IP geo-location is only accurate to about three miles. With my attack demo, however, I've been consistently getting locations within about 10 meters [32 feet] of the device."
 
Google initially told Young they would not be fixing the problem; however, after going to the press about the issue, Young reports that Google will be releasing an update in mid-July to address the privacy leak for both devices.
 
3. Glitches Could Lead to Invasion of Privacy
According to local news stations in Portland, Ore., a resident (reportedly named Danielle) received a disturbing phone call from one of her husband's employers telling her to shut off her smart home devices. After using Amazon devices throughout her home to control temperature, lighting and security, Danielle was made aware that a private conversation was accidentally recorded by Amazon's artificial intelligence system, Alexa, and was sent to a number on the family's contact list.
 
Amazon has since reported that the Echo speaker picked up words in Danielle's background conversations that it interpreted as "wake words" for recording and sending audio to a contact; however, an article published by website The Information last July states that Amazon was considering obtaining recorded conversations and sending transcripts to developers so they can build more responsive software, making it unclear if these devices automatically record audio without waiting for "wake words."
 
These Vulnerabilities Could Impact Real Estate
Smart homes are increasing across the country. According to Statista, a statistics website, the estimated value of the North American smart home market will be $27 billion by 2021.
 
Of course, the vulnerabilities that have cropped up for some users could have an impact on the selling process. For example, some sellers have already begun using their security systems as a way to listen in on prospective buyers or watch them as they visit the listed home, regardless of whether local laws prohibit these recording practices.
 
Additionally, if homeowners have devices such as Google Home or Amazon Echo, but do not have security cameras, how can they be sure that visiting buyers are not accessing sensitive information through these speakers? While agents always play a role in adding a measure of security by being present during showings, fraudulent activity that is internet-based only, such as obtaining online data through links, will be difficult to identify.
 
Liz Dominguez is RISMedia's associate content editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at ldominguez@rismedia.com.

Thanks for visiting my Blog site. If you would like to discuss this topic with me or get more information please contact me by calling 919-247-4667 or emailing me at Tim@TheTrianglesBroker.com. And you can always visit my personal real estate website for lots of additional information and to search for homes at www.TheTrianglesBroker.com or www.BuyAndSelllingTriangleHomes.com  McBrayer – The Triangles Broker.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2018. All rights reserved.

Stung by a Bee? Here’s What to Do

Honeybees are an incredibly important part of our ecosystem, but unfortunately, when they feel threatened, they tend to provide a less-than-pleasant surprise. When stung by a bee, here are the steps you can take to reduce pain and inflammation, according to Thomas Arnold, MD, Professor and Chairman, Department of Emergency Medicine, LSU Health Sciences Center Shreveport.

Remove the stinger with a dull-edged object. Unlike wasps and other kinds of bees, honeybees have a barbed stinger that stays in the skin after a sting, ultimately killing the bee. Remove the stinger and venom sack with a blunt object like the edge of a credit card or a butter knife by gently scraping against the skin.

Apply a cool compress. Ice or another cool compress can reduce pain, while an antihistamine can help ease itching and swelling.

Elevate the area. The swelling caused by a sting can be quite scary. It's not uncommon for a hand that's stung to swell to twice its size. If the sting is on an extremity that can be raised, elevating it can help reduce swelling.

Some individuals may be allergic to bees, and in that case, their reactions will be more severe—and in some cases, deadly.

Dr. Arnold details what to watch for in someone who suffers a severe allergic reaction, also known as a generalized reaction. Stings in these individuals can cause anaphylaxis and can be fatal. Symptoms to watch closely for include:

-A feeling of uneasiness, tingling sensations, and dizziness
-Generalized itching and hives
-Swelling of the lips and tongue
-Wheezing and difficulty breathing
-Collapse and loss of consciousness

If any of these symptoms occur, call an ambulance to take the individual to a hospital immediately.

Source: MerckManuals.com

Thanks for visiting my Blog site. If you would like to discuss this topic with me or get more information please contact me by calling 919-247-4667 or emailing me at Tim@TheTrianglesBroker.com. And you can always visit my personal real estate website for lots of additional information and to search for homes at www.TheTrianglesBroker.com or www.BuyAndSelllingTriangleHomes.com  McBrayer – The Triangles Broker.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2018. All rights reserved.

6 Fun, Educational Summer Activities for Kids

(Family Features)–Summer may be a break from formal education, but keeping kids excited about learning can be an easy way to keep them active and engaged instead of zoned out on screen time.

The National Summer Learning Association estimates that kids can lose up to two months of learning during the summer, but involving kids in educational summer activities can prevent them from forgetting skills they learned during the school year.

Encourage your kids to keep learning outside of school with these fun and educational summer activities.
Visit a Science Museum

Spend a rainy day enjoying a science museum, which offers hands-on experiences to make learning fun. Kids can build on what they've already learned and apply new discoveries when they return to school in the fall. Many museums offer special prices for families, which makes it an opportunity for the whole family to bond. Once you get home, talk about favorite exhibits or lessons, and ask kids to express those memories on paper in the form of a journal entry or colorful drawing.

Head to the Zoo or Aquarium
At a conservation-oriented destination like an Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA)-accredited zoo or aquarium, kids can learn about the importance of environmentally friendly practices, animal care and welfare, and more. Families can also explore the unique challenges facing endangered species and discover how members are Saving Animals From Extinction (SAFE). After learning about animals that need help, kids can visit zebrapen.com/aza for fun games that reinforce what they learned.

Go on a Nature Hike
Hikes provide abundant nature lessons, giving kids a chance to get some exercise while exploring and appreciating their surroundings. Visit a national or local park to get some fresh air and learn about preserving nature. Along with a picnic lunch, bring along information about local wildlife and plants, and have kids search for each item on the list as a scavenger hunt. Back at home, test their memories by having them create a collage of all the things they found.

See a Show at a Children's Theater
Experiencing live theater is a positive way to introduce kids to new cultural experiences. Because they're typically short in run time, most shows can hold the attention of kids of all ages while conveying important life lessons. Pick a show with lots of interaction that can allow kids to stay focused and maybe even participate in the action. Acting out their favorite scenes, illustrating favorite characters or writing a new scene or different ending are all ways to keep the learning going after the curtains close.

Join a Library Program
Special summer programs at libraries can give kids a chance to enhance their reading skills. Many local libraries offer contests that challenge kids to read a certain number of books during the summer and include a series of incentives for reaching certain milestones. The reading component is often supplemented with crafts and activities to make reading fun. Extend the challenge even further by choosing a favorite book and asking kids to write or draw a sequel that takes those characters on another exciting adventure.

Capture Life's Moments
In addition to getting out and exploring new things, encourage daily writing, coloring and expression by asking kids to creatively capture their summer experiences. Teaching kids to write and draw about things they find fun is a great way to reinforce what they've learned and foster a love for writing.

Source: Zebra Pen

Thanks for visiting my Blog site. If you would like to discuss this topic with me or get more information please contact me by calling 919-247-4667 or emailing me at Tim@TheTrianglesBroker.com. And you can always visit my personal real estate website for lots of additional information and to search for homes at www.TheTrianglesBroker.com or www.BuyAndSelllingTriangleHomes.com  McBrayer – The Triangles Broker.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2018. All rights reserved.

Live in a Small Space? You Can Still Buy in Bulk!

The appeal of shopping at a warehouse store like Costco or online at Amazon is so alluring—buy in bulk, order online, save on trips to the store, enjoy discounts…the advantages are many.

But if you live in a small space—like a condo, an apartment, or a diminutive home packed to the rafters with a large family—you may feel like bulk shopping is out of the question. Not so, says Emily Fleischaker, an organization expert who runs a kitchen organization service called Kitchen Fly, and recently shared some great tips with epicurious.com. Here’s what Fleischaker advises:

Start with a food diary. And not for counting calories! According to Fleischaker, paying attention to what you eat and how often you eat it will help you make wise decisions about what to buy in bulk. Taking notes on your cooking habits for two weeks will also provide clues as to what spices and ingredients might be wise to buy in bulk.

Divide and store based on use. Fleischaker says you don't have to store your bulk ingredients or food categories together if space doesn’t allow. Instead, divide up your bulk items and store them based on frequency of use. For example, if you use pasta regularly, keep a couple of boxes handy and store the rest on a high shelf or even in a closet in a different room.

Take things out of their original container. By “decanting” products like grains, beans and nuts into other storage containers, you’ll actually keep your cabinets more organized and your food items more accessible. Odds are, the vessels you transfer them to will take up less space, as well. Have a warehouse-sized can of olive oil or a huge sack of rice? Decant a small portion into a glass bottle or jar to keep handy—and store the rest in an out-of-the-way spot (think on a shelf in the garage or a bin under your bed).

Take inventory. Fleischaker suggests keeping a list of the items you've bought in bulk or that you have in an overflow storage area so that you don’t forget about them and accidentally buy more. Keep the list on the fridge or by your computer. 

Most importantly, be flexible. As your habits change, so should your organizational system, says Fleischaker. So, every now and then, start up a new food diary, rearrange your storage and restrategize your bulk shopping plan. Remember, it’s a fluid process that changes with the seasons and your cooking and eating preferences.
 
If you’d like more homeowner information, please contact me.

Thanks for visiting my Blog site. If you would like to discuss this topic with me or get more information please contact me by calling 919-247-4667 or emailing me at Tim@TheTrianglesBroker.com. And you can always visit my personal real estate website for lots of additional information and to search for homes at www.TheTrianglesBroker.com or www.BuyAndSelllingTriangleHomes.com  McBrayer – The Triangles Broker.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2018. All rights reserved.

Surviving a Relocation

Relocating to a new area can be an exciting proposition. It can also be a process that's full of stress. Here are some tips from relocation pros to help ease the strain and emphasize the positive when moving out of town:

1. Lighten your load. Getting rid of unnecessary paperwork, clothing, knickknacks and furniture is essential with any move, but even more so when you’re relocating out of town or out of state. Not only will this save on moving costs, it will save you unpacking time on the other end, allowing you to focus on that new job that brought you to the area and on getting to know your new community and neighbors—all of which is more important than stacking books you don’t need onto shelves.

2. Hire a pro. While you may have opted for DIY moves in the past, relocating out of the area warrants calling in the pros. If you’re being relocated by your employer, this is probably being covered, but even if you’re not, make room in the budget for moving professionals. Ask for referrals, get at least three quotes, and carefully go over all of their policies, including insurance for damages and loss.

3. Transition kids. Children add a whole new layer to the relocation equation, so make sure you make them top priority. Do your research to find the schools that will be the best fit and set appointments to meet with school counselors as you get to town (or even before you move, if possible). Find out where your kids can resume their favorite activities, whether it’s dance or hockey, and get some intel on whether similar-aged children live in the neighborhood. Keep the communication flowing and open, and address all of your children’s concerns head-on. At all costs, don’t minimize their concerns—validate them instead. 

4. Deal with all emotions. Your kids won’t be the only ones on an emotional rollercoaster. Be sure to process your own wide range of emotions along with those of your spouse or partner, in addition to those of family and friends you’ll be leaving behind. Don’t just talk about keeping in touch, but rather, make plans for doing so. And be sure to make use of technology to keep the connections real and frequent.

5. Make some plans. To make sure your arrival in your new location starts on a high note, plan some activities in advance, whether it’s dinner reservations at a local hot spot, a play or concert if you’re near a city center, or a hike at a nearby state park. The idea is to dive into the exciting activities your new location has to offer. This will help you begin to appreciate your new home, easing any sadness of leaving your old one behind.
 
If you’d like more homeowner information, please contact me.

Thanks for visiting my Blog site. If you would like to discuss this topic with me or get more information please contact me by calling 919-247-4667 or emailing me at Tim@TheTrianglesBroker.com. And you can always visit my personal real estate website for lots of additional information and to search for homes at www.TheTrianglesBroker.com or www.BuyAndSelllingTriangleHomes.com  McBrayer – The Triangles Broker.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2018. All rights reserved.

7 Safety Tips for Operating a Pressure Washer

As with any power equipment, it's important to know how to operate a pressure washer safely and correctly. Even if you've had your unit for a while, it's a good idea to refresh yourself on how to use it properly before you get started on your outdoor to-do list.

1. Dress for the task. Wear indirect-vented (chemical splash) goggles for eye protection, and a pair of closed-toe shoes such as sneakers or boots.

2. Before getting started, be sure to remove all electronics, cords and wires, and place them safely away from water.

3. Perform routine maintenance. Prior to each use, check the oil level and top off if low. Check the water screens to ensure they can freely move water. Inspect hoses and couplings; if they are cracked or brittle, replace them.

4. Know your equipment and where it can or can't be used. Never operate your gas pressure washer indoors or in enclosed structures. When operating a gas pressure washer, use it outdoors away from occupied spaces to prevent a potentially deadly build-up of carbon monoxide.

5. When operating a gas pressure washer, know the signs of potential carbon monoxide poisoning (dizziness, fatigue, headache, nausea or irregular breathing), and if you experience these symptoms, get to fresh air right away and seek medical attention.

6. Always point the nozzle in a safe direction. Never operate a pressure washer near small children or pets.

7. Before storing, relieve the pressure in the system. Also, run a cycle of water through the machine to eliminate any detergent residue and give the unit time to cool down before storing.

Source: Briggs & Stratton

Thanks for visiting my Blog site. If you would like to discuss this topic with me or get more information please contact me by calling 919-247-4667 or emailing me at Tim@TheTrianglesBroker.com. And you can always visit my personal real estate website for lots of additional information and to search for homes at www.TheTrianglesBroker.com or www.BuyAndSelllingTriangleHomes.com  McBrayer – The Triangles Broker.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2018. All rights reserved.

5 Tips for Healthy Summer Hydration

(Family Features)—Summer provides countless opportunities to get outside for hiking, biking and running around with friends and family; however, having fun in the sun also requires proper hydration.

While staying hydrated may seem easy, healthy hydration is not always a given. For example, the water coming out of your faucet can travel through miles of aging pipes before it reaches your home, potentially picking up unwanted contaminants such as lead, pesticides and industrial pollutants along the way.

These tips can assist in achieving healthy hydration throughout the summer months:

Drink plenty of water. It may seem simple, but consuming an appropriate amount of water can be especially important when temperatures reach sweltering levels. Since the human body is 60 percent water, it's a vital step for your health to make sure you're getting enough of it, which is why Healthline recommends 6-8 glasses (8 ounces each) of water per day.

Make sure it's pure. In addition to drinking the right amount of water, it's also important to drink the right kind of water. Consider installing an in-home filtered water solution.

Take it to-go. Keeping a bottle of water with you when you're out and about is a convenient way to stay hydrated. Rather than disposable plastic water bottles, consider using a refillable, BPA-free bottle, which is a more environmentally-friendly choice and typically more affordable.

Add a little flavor. Quench your thirst and add some refreshing flavor and nutrients to your water by infusing it with strawberries, kiwi, orange, mint or melon slices.

Eat water-rich foods. An overlooked option for maintaining proper hydration is eating fruits and vegetables such as watermelon, cucumbers and celery that naturally contain water. For the freshest results, wash your fruits and vegetables with filtered water prior to eating them.

Source: PUR

Thanks for visiting my Blog site. If you would like to discuss this topic with me or get more information please contact me by calling 919-247-4667 or emailing me at Tim@TheTrianglesBroker.com. And you can always visit my personal real estate website for lots of additional information and to search for homes at www.TheTrianglesBroker.com or www.BuyAndSelllingTriangleHomes.com  McBrayer – The Triangles Broker.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2018. All rights reserved.

$1 Million: What It Buys in the U.S. Housing Market

One-million dollars is a lot of money to most of the world's population, but it's a drop in the bucket to a billionaire. The housing market in the U.S. seems to have a similar relationship with homes valued between $900,000 and $1.1 million: Some of them are sprawling estates, while others are considered middle-of-the-road homes.
 
HouseCanary examined homes valued around $1 million in different metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) across the country to determine what an "average" million-dollar home looks like, from San Francisco to Tuscaloosa, Ala. We found that what a million dollars will buy can vary widely from place to place—so if you've got $1 million to spend on a home, here's what you can expect to get in return.
 

Where $1 Million Is Big Money
In most markets, $1 million will get you a lot of house, but they might not be considered mansion material. We found that in the preponderance of markets (110 out of 375 metro areas), a million-dollar home is somewhere between 3,000 and 4,000 square feet. But there are also some markets where you can buy a true mansion or estate if you're willing to spend between $900,000 and $1.1 million.
 
Those markets tend to be at least somewhat off the beaten path, so you may be sacrificing some shopping convenience, access to airports, or proximity to cultural, sports, or other local assets. And those markets may not also have relatively high household income, meaning you've got to save for a lot longer to make that million-dollar down payment. But the amount of room you'll get to spread out and do your thing might make that kind of sacrifice well worth it!
 

 
Ohio is one state with several big cities, but it's in unassuming Lima, about 90 minutes northwest of Columbus, where you'll find the best deals for $1 million. The average million-dollar home in Lima, Ohio, is 9,435 square feet and sits on a four-acre lot. It has five-plus bedrooms, four bathrooms, and 4-5 parking spots. For that million-dollar home, buyers pay about $105.99 per square foot.
 
In Lima, most homes are very affordable. To pay a mortgage on a median-priced home in Lima, the median-income household would spend 17.30 percent of its income. The median household income in Lima is $45,575, and you can still buy a home there for much less than $100,000. So it's not surprising that the two million-dollar homes in Lima are much larger than average!
 
You'll find similar bang for your million-dollar buck in Anniston-Oxford-Jacksonville, Ala., about an hour and 20 minutes northeast of Birmingham, where the average million-dollar home is 8,354 square feet and sits on a five-acre lot. It has three bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, and 4-5 parking spaces. The price-per-square foot in this corner of Alabama for a million-dollar home is about $119.70.
 
Homes are also very affordable in Anniston-Oxford-Jacksonville, with the median household spending just shy of 17 percent of total household income ($41,954 annually) on a median-priced house.
 
Texas is another state with several big cities—Houston and Dallas are two of the biggest cities in the country. In Wichita Falls, Texas, about two hours and change northeast of Dallas, your average million-dollar home comes on a whopping 60-acre lot and is 7,852 square feet. The price-per-square foot is about $127.36—still very reasonable. It has five bedrooms, 4.5 bathrooms and four parking spots, and the median household in Wichita Falls spends just 13.94 percent of its annual $46,043 income on a median-priced home.
 
$1 Million in the Middle
Even though there are more homes between 3,000 and 4,000 square feet than between 4,000 and 5,000, the average square footage for a million-dollar home across all metros studied is 4,305 square feet—which is quite a bit of room to stretch out, but still only about half the size of the biggest million-dollar homes in the country.
 

 
In the Nashville MSA (which also includes Davidson, Murfreesboro and Franklin, all in Tennessee), an average million-dollar home is 4,302 square feet, with 3-4 bedrooms, four bathrooms, and three parking spots nestled on a 0.96-acre lot. The price-per-square foot is $232.45—more than double the price per square foot in Lima, Ohio.
 
Affordability in Nashville is also middle-of-the-road: Most economists suggest that households spend no more than 30 percent of their total income on housing, and in Nashville, a median-priced house costs 30.5 percent of the median household income, which is $56,152 annually.
 
Richmond, Va., and St. Louis (spanning both Missouri and Illinois) are also relatively average markets. In Richmond, an average million-dollar house is 4,312 square feet on an 0.85-acre lot, with four bedrooms, four bathrooms, and two parking spots. The price-per-square foot is $231.91, slightly lower than in Nashville. A median home for a median household in Richmond uses 29.17 percent of its $61,124 annual household income.
 
And in St. Louis, the average million-dollar home is 4,330 square feet on a 0.93-acre lot. It also has four bedrooms, four bathrooms, and two parking spots. The price-per-square foot is very close to both Richmond and Nashville at $230.95. In St. Louis, the median household (which makes $56,726 per year) spends 21.83 percent of its income on a median-priced home.
 
Million-Dollar Babies
It makes sense that in areas where housing is more affordable, million-dollar homes are larger. But what happens when affordability starts to creep up (and up…and up)?
 

 
As you might guess, when affording a home captures more and more of a median household's income, the million-dollar homes get smaller. The smallest average million-dollar home in the country is in San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif., at 1,576 square feet, on a 0.13-acre lot. It has three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and two parking spots, and in this MSA, the median household spends 76.33 percent of its income ($100,469 annually) on a median-priced home. The price-per-square foot is an eye-popping $634.52, almost six times what you'd pay in Lima, Ohio, for a home.
 
In San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, Calif., you'll find a slightly bigger average million-dollar home at 1,600 square feet, on a 0.13-acre lot, with three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and two parking spots. The price-per-square foot is $625, just $9.52 lower than in San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara. A median household in the Bay Area makes $85,947 per year and typically spends 80.20 percent of its total income on a median-priced home.
 
Honolulu is another market with small average million-dollar properties. In Honolulu, the average million-dollar home is 1,846 square feet on a 0.15-acre lot, with four bedrooms, two bathrooms, and two parking spots. The price-per-square foot for a Honolulu million-dollar home is $541.71—definitely more reasonable than its San Francisco counterparts, but still almost double what you'd pay in Nashville, Richmond or St. Louis. The median household in Honolulu (which makes $77,161 per year) spends 61.62 percent of its income on a median home—still more than double the recommended amount, but much more reasonable than San Jose or San Francisco.
 
In Boulder, Colo., you can get slightly more square footage for a million dollars than in San Francisco. The average Boulder million-dollar home is 2,270 square feet on a 0.24-acre lot, costing $440.53 per square foot. It has four bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms, with two parking spots, and the median household spends just over half (51.39 percent) of its $72,282 annual income on a median home. 
 
If I Had a Million Dollars…
Would you rather have a vast estate in Lima, Ohio, or Wichita Falls, Texas, or a cozy family home in San Francisco or Honolulu? Maybe opting for something middle-of-the-road in St. Louis or Nashville makes more sense…and it's less square footage to clean!
 
This was originally published on HouseCanary. For more information, please visit www.housecanary.com

Thanks for visiting my Blog site. If you would like to discuss this topic with me or get more information please contact me by calling 919-247-4667 or emailing me at Tim@TheTrianglesBroker.com. And you can always visit my personal real estate website for lots of additional information and to search for homes at www.TheTrianglesBroker.com or www.BuyAndSelllingTriangleHomes.com  McBrayer – The Triangles Broker.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2018. All rights reserved.