Another Type of Financing Concession

Price, condition and terms are factors that any owner must consider when marketing their home. Price is usually the easiest to adjust to compensate for shortcomings in location or condition of the home. Improving the condition of the property is more time consuming but updates to kitchens, baths and other things can appeal to a buyer.

One of the most overlooked marketing factors are terms which are also referred to as financing concessions.

Paying part or all a buyer’s closing costs is the most common financing concession. By doing so, the buyer doesn’t need as much cash to get into the home which can be attractive to more buyers.

There is another financing concession that is not used very often in today’s market but it is still allowed and can increase the marketability of a home. A temporary buy-down of the interest rate makes a lower payment for an initial period.

It is still a fixed-rate mortgage that the buyer must qualify for at the note rate and there is no negative amortization. The seller pre-pays the interest in advance at closing so the buyer has lower payments in the initial period.

Instead of lowering the price of the home, let’s say the seller has decided to offer $6,875 worth of financing concessions that the buyer can apply any way they want. One way might be to get a 2/1 buy-down which means that the first year, the payment would be based on 2% less than the note rate of the mortgage and the second year, it would be 1% less than the note rate. The third through thirtieth years, the payment would be the actual note rate.

On a $275,000 home with a 3.5% down payment at 5% for 30 years, the first year’s mortgage payment would be figured at 3% which would be $305.76 less than normal. The second year’s payment would be figured at 4% and would be $157.65 less than normal. The third through thirtieth years, the payment would be the normal payment of $1,424.59.

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It would save the buyer $5,560.90 in interest in the first two years and there would still be $1,314 of the financing concession to apply toward the buyer’s closing costs.

The financing concessions paid by the seller give the buyer lower payments for the first two years and less money needed for the closing cost. An added bonus for the buyer is that the buyer can deduct the pre-paid interest the seller paid as qualified mortgage interest.

Some lenders may tell you that temporary buy downs cannot be done. They’ve been around for over thirty years and can still be done today on FHA, VA and conventional loans. Call (919) 247-4667 if you need a recommendation of a trusted mortgage professional or check out a 2/1 Buydown with your own numbers.

44 Times More Than a Renter

The Federal Reserve Board’s Triennial Survey of Consumer Finances recently revealed the net worth of a homeowner was $231,400 compared to $5,200 for a renter. The net worth of homeowners increased 15% from 2013 to 2016 while renters’ decreased by 5%.

Appreciation and principal reduction are the two dynamics that affect a homeowner’s equity. Each payment is applied to the interest for the previous month and the principal reduction to retire the mortgage.

A $300,000 home purchased with a $294,566 FHA mortgage at 5% for 30 years has an average monthly principal reduction $362 in the first year. Two percent appreciation would benefit the buyer by $500 a month. In this example, the equity grows by $860 a month for the homeowner. A tenant would have to invest $660 a month over and above the rent they’re paying.

Based on the assumptions listed above, the $10,500 down payment would become approximately $85,000 of equity in seven years. Leverage and forced savings contribute to the difference in addition to the appreciation and principal reduction.

The rent paid by tenants help the landlord recoup their investment in the home and a return on their investment. Some people say, regardless if a person rents or buys, they pay for the house they occupy. The choice is whether to buy it for themselves or their landlord.

Check out some of the benefits using your own numbers with this fill-in-the blank Rent vs. Own.

Gift of Equity

There is a little-known mortgage program that could provide the vehicle for the right person to get into a home. If a person sells their home to another for less than the fair market value, the difference in the appraised value and the sales price is considered a gift of equity for the buyer.

FHA requires that borrowers receive gifts of equity only from family members transferring title to the borrower.

An appraisal is required to determine the value of the home. The sales price is subtracted from the appraised value to determine the equity to be gifted. If a home appraises for $300,000 when the owner will sell it for $250,000, the gift is $50,000.

The gift is applied to the down payment. In this example, the borrower would have to qualify for a $250,000 mortgage which would require private mortgage insurance because a 20% down payment on a $300,000 home would be $60,000. If the buyer had an additional $10,000 in cash to put down, the PMI would not be required, and the monthly payments would be lower.

The seller would need to provide a gift letter stating the amount of the gift, the date the gift, and that no repayment is expected or required. It also needs to have the donor’s name, address, phone, email and relationship to the buyer. In addition, the settlement statement will need to show the gift being credited from the seller to the buyer. The lender may require additional documentation.

Beginning in 2018, the annual gift tax exemption is increased to $15,000 per person per year and lifetime exemption to $5.6 million. The fact that the $50,000 exceeds the individual amount doesn’t mean there will necessarily be any gift tax due now. The seller should consult their tax professional.

Key Winter Prep That Will Protect Your Home’s Value

Protecting your home’s value means taking good care of it during the more demanding winter months, especially if you’re eyeing a spring sale. According to the Appraisal Institute, winterizing your property will go a long way toward reducing future costs, not to mention keeping you more comfortable in chilly weather.  

Winterization projects that will contribute most to your home’s value are those that focus on your lawn, deck and roof.

– Tend to your lawn by raking, mowing and fertilizing before the cold months set in.

– Check to see if your deck needs protecting by pouring some water on it; if the water beads up, then you’re in good shape. If it doesn’t, then clean and seal your deck.

– Make sure your roof is ready to handle the elements by doing a careful inspection and replacing any shingles or repairing any compromised sections. While you’ve got the ladder out, clean out any gutters to avoid ice damming.

Of course, getting your home ready for winter also means paying attention to energy usage. According to the Energy Saver Guide, homeowners should:

– Use smart and programmable thermostats, which can help lower energy bills by as much as 10 percent per year.

– Replace the home's heating system if it's more than 15 years old.

– Use heat pumps instead of electric furnaces or electric baseboard heaters to reduce electricity used for heating by up to 50 percent.

– Determine their eligibility for weatherization and home energy assistance.

Thanks for visiting my Blog site. If you would like to discuss this topic with me or get more information please contact me by calling 919-247-4667 or emailing me at Tim@TheTrianglesBroker.com. And you can always visit my personal real estate website for lots of additional information and to search for homes at www.TheTrianglesBroker.com or www.BuyAndSelllingTriangleHomes.com  McBrayer – The Triangles Broker.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2018. All rights reserved.